Why choose midwifery?

Deciding what to pursue as a profession can be a daunting experience. After all, there are so many opportunities available – making the choice is the hardest part!

What if there was a career that combines passion and people, as well as dedication and reward? What if you could make a difference to the lives of people every single day?

Midwives help women and children at one of the most crucial times of their lives. They are recognised members of the health care community who:

  • Work in partnership with women to give the necessary support, care and advice during pregnancy, labour and the postpartum period
  • Conduct births and provide care for the newborn and the mother, which can include preventative measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, the accessing of medical care or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
  • Undertake health counselling and educationnot only for the woman, but also within the family and the community. 

But what motivates someone to take on this challenging, yet rewarding, role?

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We’ve asked eight students to explain why they decided to become midwives. Their stories might surprise you, and might even inspire you to consider midwifery as an option.

Clare Sandy

After having children, I realised how important midwives are to women and how much they can make a difference during your pregnancy. I wanted to be able to give other women the support and care that I had received from my midwives.

Keshana Jeevaratnam

I have always wanted to work in health because of how practical and hands-on the work is. In midwifery, I would be able to combine my love of science and the human body with a profession that was highly interpersonal.

Sophie Kalatzis

One notable passion of mine is to empower women, particularly during crucial moments of life including pregnancy, labour, birth and the postpartum period. I wanted to pursue an occupation that would enable me to not only exercise that passion, but also play an integral role in the extraordinary transition of a woman becoming a mother.

Jayne Margetts

I became interested in Midwifery after the births of my three children. I was cared for by some amazing midwives who inspired my interest. I always thought it would be a really rewarding job but it wasn’t until afterwards that I decided to take the plunge.

Elizabeth Holland

From a very young age, I have been obsessed with the fact that women grow babies inside themselves… I’m completely fascinated by pregnancy and birth!

Demi Chilchik

I wanted to study midwifery after both my mother and grandmother experienced complex pregnancies. My mother suffered from severe Pre-Eclampsia (a hypertensive disease of pregnancy) whilst pregnant with me. She became very ill and both of us almost died. My grandmother too had trouble staying pregnant and in order to safely deliver my uncle, was bedridden for 22 weeks of her pregnancy. In speaking to them about their experiences, I was inspired to become a midwife and help women in similar situations.

Caitlin Compton

Midwifery balances my love of science and health care while mediating my desire to collaborate with people.

Taylor Mustow

While completing a different degree, I decided my passion was in midwifery. Learning about human development, anatomy and physiology made me realise how amazing a woman’s body is! Being able to grow another human inside of you is absolutely incredible! I was fascinated and wanted the opportunity to work with and support women in what is most likely one of the most significant events in their life.


For more inspiring stories, head over to our website to read about the experiences of undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Find out more about Midwifery at UTS.

 

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